Author Topic: Milling machine tram tool  (Read 81160 times)

Offline Darren

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #50 on: April 12, 2009, 02:41:29 PM »
I see, so you held the quill up and not down, I would have started on the wrong foot  :thumbup:

Been out in this incredible sun all day, started on may garage roof. Boy it was hot today, almost too hot to work outside  :dremel:

I'll have a look at the mill in a bit, btw my depth stop is a threaded bar, all I need now is a spring...... :ddb:

Thanks for the tips  :thumbup:
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bogstandard

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #51 on: April 12, 2009, 04:04:50 PM »
You've got it Darren, the quill has to be pulled up.

I tried to use the depth stop, but it just wasn't long enough before the spring got a mechanical lock, and also the diameter was wrong for the spring I eventually managed to find.

I honestly think, the bit I mentioned last time with the single pulley and a long tension spring would be the ideal permanent solution. Easily adjustable for tension, and no mechanical lock ups.

John

Offline Darren

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #52 on: April 12, 2009, 07:30:38 PM »
Thanks John, I will look into this and give it some more thought.... :thumbup:
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Offline Bourne Bill

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #53 on: April 24, 2009, 02:47:47 PM »
Take a look in this site. It tells how to take the backlash out of the quill.

Micro-Machine Shop
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Last updated on Thursday, April 23, 2009 06:40:34 AM          Let the chips fly!           
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Offline Darren

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #54 on: April 24, 2009, 03:01:08 PM »
Thanks for that, I'd read that site before but wasn't looking for that info at the time.....

Well spotted  :thumbup:
You will find it a distinct help… if you know and look as if you know what you are doing. (IRS training manual)

Offline Brass_Machine

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #55 on: April 24, 2009, 03:23:54 PM »
Take a look in this site. It tells how to take the backlash out of the quill.

Micro-Machine Shop
microcosm - A small, representative system having analogies to a larger system in constitution, configuration, or development.
corollary - You can't have too many tools.  
  



Thanks Bill... got some reading ahead of me.

Eric
« Last Edit: December 03, 2010, 12:05:03 AM by Brass_Machine »
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Offline Bogstandard

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #56 on: December 02, 2010, 06:06:59 PM »
Just a little update.

Anyone ever seen one of these before




Bogs
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Offline andyf

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #57 on: December 02, 2010, 07:48:35 PM »
Yup - distinct sense of deja vu. I'm sure that if you anodised yours, you would choose a more tasteful hue.

Andy

Sale, Cheshire
I've cut the end off it twice, but it's still too short

Offline No1_sonuk

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #58 on: January 07, 2011, 10:16:19 AM »
Just a little update.

Anyone ever seen one of these before
Yup, I have one in my cupboard.  :thumbup:

Offline irishwoodsman

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #59 on: November 14, 2011, 10:20:23 AM »
Nice jig, but i have a question, i want to use this to cut morse tapers in a lathe. do i have to space the indicators the same distance as the length of the taper. i will be useing this to set the degree of my compound so i can machine the taper  ty for any info

Offline fatal-exception

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #60 on: November 17, 2011, 03:42:06 PM »
Great project Bogs! I've seen these around and have though about how handy they would be each time I have to tram the mills.

The bit about turning down the shank after it's installed in the bar is the chunk of the puzzle that makes it all good.  :D I wonder if this step could be avoided if the hole was bored on the lathe?

It seems that as your project list goes down, mine goes up!  :hammer:

Thanks for the writeup.

Paul

Offline andyf

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #61 on: November 18, 2011, 01:03:34 PM »
Nice jig, but i have a question, i want to use this to cut morse tapers in a lathe. do i have to space the indicators the same distance as the length of the taper. i will be useing this to set the degree of my compound so i can machine the taper  ty for any info

A more convenient way to angle the compound might be to look up the taper per inch here http://littlemachineshop.com/Reference/Tapers.php, and angle the topslide so that a dial indicator bearing on the side of it exhibits the appropriate variation when the carriage is moved along by 1". Your topslide will probably be long enough to double, treble or quadruple the figures and measure over 2, 3 or 4" for greater accuracy.

Check by rough measurement of a similar taper whether the per inch figure is measured over the diameter or the radius. If the former, halve it or you will end up with a taper twice as steep as you require, as I once found out through carelessness  :bang:

Unless you can bring a morse socket up to work held in the chuck for a test fit with engineer's blue, it would be better to turn it between centres. Then, if some tiny adjustment is needed, you won't be troubled with chucking errors when returning it to the lathe.

Andy.
Sale, Cheshire
I've cut the end off it twice, but it's still too short

Offline tel

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #62 on: November 21, 2011, 04:41:55 PM »
Like this


Offline andyf

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #63 on: November 21, 2011, 04:55:26 PM »
Exactly, Tel, except that when working on a virgin length of barstock, you can centre drill both ends and use a regular centre direct in the tailstock, rather than the female one in a drill chuck you have had to use with your ready-made demo item.


Andy

PS I suppose this is all very  :offtopic: for Bog's tram tool thread, so I'd better say no more...

PPS ... Except that a dog will be needed to drive the item.


Sale, Cheshire
I've cut the end off it twice, but it's still too short

Offline fatal-exception

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #64 on: December 01, 2011, 03:18:04 PM »
For those of you Canucks on here, I found some good quality, cheap dial indicators from Accusize Tools out of Ontario. $12 each + shipping. http://www.accusizetools.ca/products_details.asp?big=1&small=20&proid=15

I whipped up a variation of Bogs design in Solidworks and have attached it to this post. I'll post my results when it's done!

Happy chip making!  :)

Paul

Offline fatal-exception

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #65 on: December 06, 2011, 12:37:57 PM »
 :update:
Here's mine. I deviated from the plan slightly as far as the shape goes. I adjusted a fly cutter to make the grooves in the body in a single pass. After I did the front and back, I was having so much fun I flipped the part and did the top and bottom too. I really don't like the yellow anodizing. I 'perpendicularized' the spindle post the same way Bogs did, on the faceplate of the lathe, and good thing.




The milling head of the big mill is out a bit in both directions, which can now be accurately adjusted.

If course, it can be used to tram the tailstock of the lathe too. Mine's way out in both directions:




I haven't checked my cnc router yet, but I know that it's out a bit, and it can be used to accurately set the drill press table too.

All I need to do is make a nice fitting, foam filled box for it.... :headbang:

Paul

Offline DaveH

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #66 on: December 06, 2011, 02:20:26 PM »
Paul,

Looks very nice,  :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: I quite like the yellow anodizing. :clap: :clap: :clap:

A very nice and usefull bit of kit.
 :beer:
DaveH
(Ex Leicester, Thurmaston, Ashby De La Zouch.)

Offline buffalow bill

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #67 on: December 06, 2011, 02:41:04 PM »
Paul,
A question from an electrician with no previous machining experience
About checking the lathe tail/head stock, how do you know which is out tail or head?
  :Doh:

Bill.
Helensburgh, Argyll & Bute

Offline andyf

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #68 on: December 06, 2011, 02:44:52 PM »
Nice job, Paul :thumbup: . I quite like the yellow, too.

You need one of John Hill's cushiony boxes to keep it safe:
http://madmodder.net/index.php?topic=4770.0

Andy

Sale, Cheshire
I've cut the end off it twice, but it's still too short

Offline Spurry

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #69 on: December 06, 2011, 06:31:30 PM »
Just wondering how you reference those clocks to the bottom face of the gadget. They just seem to stick out (scientific expression  :bugeye: ) a long way.

Pete

Offline grayone

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #70 on: December 06, 2011, 09:46:48 PM »
Just wondering how you reference those clocks to the bottom face of the gadget. They just seem to stick out (scientific expression  :bugeye: ) a long way.

Pete

I wondered about that as well as I am planning on making one.  Dial gauges enroute from Hongkong so project 996 for when I retire :D My idea to calibrate it would be to pack up using parallels under the body with it sitting on a surgace plate.  Then simply adjust the dial gauges until they read the same and tighten the screws holding them in the tool.
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Offline 75Plus

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #71 on: December 06, 2011, 10:18:39 PM »
The clocks are mounted so that the plungers can collapse inside the base. The unit is held firmly on a flat surface and the clocks zeroed. This is the reason it was so important to do the final machining on the stem while the base was clamped securely to a previously trued face plate. See reply #19 on page 1 of this thread for an explanation.

Joe

Offline Stilldrillin

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #72 on: December 07, 2011, 02:14:00 AM »
While admiring this design of tramming tooling for a long time now.......  :clap: :thumbup:

I can't get away from the concern that it must stay square to itself.
Also, it must be mounted perfectly square to the m/c spindle.

How do you know it is still in spec, after some use?  :scratch:

The last pic. above, assumes the drill chuck is perfectly true to it's arbor, and tailstock centre line....... 

David D
David.

Still drilling holes... Sometimes, in the right place!

Still modifying bits of metal... Occasionally, making an improvement!

Offline spuddevans

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #73 on: December 07, 2011, 02:19:18 AM »
How do you know it is still in spec, after some use?  :scratch:

I suppose you take a reading, note down the results, and then rotate the spindle 180 degrees and see if the readings for each end still match the 1st set of readings :scratch:


Tim
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Offline sbwhart

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Re: Milling machine tram tool
« Reply #74 on: December 07, 2011, 03:33:27 AM »
How do you know it is still in spec, after some use?  :scratch:

I suppose you take a reading, note down the results, and then rotate the spindle 180 degrees and see if the readings for each end still match the 1st set of readings :scratch:


Tim

Thats what I do with mine its still OK after a souple of years use.

Stew
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