Author Topic: rotary table D1-4 reciever  (Read 28147 times)

Offline RotarySMP

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
  • Country: at
Re: rotary table D1-4 reciever
« Reply #25 on: August 26, 2015, 03:03:32 PM »
Bit of thread necrophilia here, but there are not many on the Internet who have actually made a Camlock nose.

The ISO Standards tolerances on the taper are increadibly tight, as the chucks should touch on the taper and the flange. Did you do anything special like grinding, to hit those tolerance? How did you measure the taper? Did you just set the compound with the sine bar, and turn till you had a good fit on an existing chuck?

I am told that the only way to accurately measure that tolerance would be with an air gauge, but that just causes a new chicken egg problem.

Regards
Mark
Best regards, Meilleures salutations, Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Cu salutari
Mark
https://www.youtube.com/c/RotarySMP

Offline philf

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1103
  • Country: gb
Re: rotary table D1-4 reciever
« Reply #26 on: August 26, 2015, 04:10:38 PM »
Hi Mark,

I needed to regrind the taper on my Boxford 1130 which has a D1-3 camlock nose.

After much thought I came up with this gauge to get it right.



The gauge is a lump of steel with a plain hole bored to about the mean diameter of the taper of the nose. There are three micrometer heads at 120 degrees which read zero when the spindle faces are level with surface of the gauge. I measured the bore diameter accurately and then calculated how much the three micrometer spindles should project such that when the bore was pushed on the taper the faces of the spindles would touch the flat surface of the nose.

I then tried it on a CVA toolroom lathe with the same taper and, much to my surprise, it worked perfectly and the calculated projections were perfect.

On my own lathe I set the topslide to the taper with a 1 micron dial gauge and cleaned up the taper. (The taper was really OK but the flat face had damage and you have to remove a tiny amount from the taper which equates to quite a bit off the flat surface.) I then ground just enough to clean up the flat surface with a flared cup wheel and tried the gauge and adjusted the micrometers until all three gave the same reading whilst the bore was in contact with the taper. (This takes quite a bit of trial and error but doesn't take that long.) This told me how much more to take off the flat surface.

It's certainly good enough for my purposes now.

Hope this makes sense.

Cheers.

Phil.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2017, 01:20:07 PM by philf »
Phil Fern
Location: Marple, Cheshire

Offline RotarySMP

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
  • Country: at
Re: rotary table D1-4 reciever
« Reply #27 on: August 27, 2015, 06:13:59 AM »
The taper is so short, how did you dial it in? Was it enough to run the DTI up taper?

I have a Boley 4L, and am not a fan of the threaded nose. I was thinking of making a D1-3 adaptor (hopefully with a taper lock Fitting to clam  it on the spindle alignment feature, for turning in reverse). I will get a couple of Commercial D1-3 flanges.

Mark
Best regards, Meilleures salutations, Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Cu salutari
Mark
https://www.youtube.com/c/RotarySMP

Offline philf

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1103
  • Country: gb
Re: rotary table D1-4 reciever
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2015, 07:05:41 AM »
Hi Mark,

I can't remember if I used a 1 micron or 0.5 micron dial gauge and set the top slide such that I got zero movement on the gauge.

You could of course use a sine bar.

Phil
Phil Fern
Location: Marple, Cheshire

Offline RotarySMP

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 463
  • Country: at
Re: rotary table D1-4 reciever
« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2015, 12:50:26 PM »
Thanks for the info Phil. I Need to get a few other Projects moving alon before I do this one, but will surely get back to you with questions once I start.

Mark

Best regards, Meilleures salutations, Mit freundlichen Grüßen, Cu salutari
Mark
https://www.youtube.com/c/RotarySMP