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induction heater

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shipto:
I brought an induction heater which I have been using to oil blacken some diehead parts but as I didn't have any cooling I have been doing 4-5 then switching it off to allow it to cool. So now I am working on housing it properly (not on a brick  :lol:) and adding cooling.

As luck would have it my daughter replaced her "broken" CPU cooler which when I stripped it apart I found had somehow leaked all the fluid out and was just pumping air around the system, seems daft that they dont give you some way to fill it?

So to start with I swapped the coil on the induction heater from the top to the bottom of the board and cut some aluminium angle to mount to the radiator to get me started. The filler bottle will be fixed at an angle because I plan to be able to use it in two orientations.

shipto:
After a little thinking about I currently have the setup in the picture but I am now thinking I may modify it a little and make the power supply sit at a slight angle but I am out of aluminium for now so will have to look at it tomorrow.

I am still trying to decide if I should include some kind of timer and auto shut off, I guess I will have to see how it runs once piped up.

ddmckee54:
It'll help, but depending on the size of your heater you're probably going to need more cooling than that radiator can supply.  The induction heaters I've worked on needed a LOT of cooling but they were a little bigger than yours.  If you want to use the induction heater for any length of time, you'll probably need more cooling capacity.  A CPU cooler is probably good for a couple of hundred watts - if that much.

I would imagine that this set-up would be similar to the coolers used on some of the CO2 lasers.  I think those guys start with a bucket of ice-water and shut down when the water gets warm.  On a closed cooling system think BIG and cold, the more thermal mass you have, and the colder it is, the longer you can run.

shipto:

--- Quote from: ddmckee54 on November 12, 2021, 04:16:31 PM ---It'll help, but depending on the size of your heater you're probably going to need more cooling than that radiator can supply.  The induction heaters I've worked on needed a LOT of cooling but they were a little bigger than yours.  If you want to use the induction heater for any length of time, you'll probably need more cooling capacity.  A CPU cooler is probably good for a couple of hundred watts - if that much.

I would imagine that this set-up would be similar to the coolers used on some of the CO2 lasers.  I think those guys start with a bucket of ice-water and shut down when the water gets warm.  On a closed cooling system think BIG and cold, the more thermal mass you have, and the colder it is, the longer you can run.

--- End quote ---
Thats food for thought but the radiator does have two large fans mounted on it and the pump itself I was going to just mount on the side somewhere but I have a rather large heatsink I could mount it on instead. Might also be worth mounting a temp readout too, not sure how high the ones I have go up to will have to check that tomorrow.

awemawson:
The rule of thumb Iíve worked to is 40% of the output power of the induction furnace is needed for cooling the electronics and the coils and cables.

So my 100 KW output induction furnace originally had a 39 KW refrigeration chiller (which Iíve replaced by a huge heat exchanger fed by 47 litre a minute ground water sourced water supply at about 10.5 degrees C  from my borehole)

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